Please login to continue
Forgot your password?
Recover it here.
Don't have an account?
Sign Up Now!

Sign Up for Free

Name
Email
Choose Password
Confirm Password

Prisca Batamuriza

NG04930 Prisca and her four brothers are the children of two aging peasant farmers from the Kyotera countryside in central Uganda. When Prisca entered the Child Development Program in 2010, her parents were struggling to raise enough funds for her education and had planned for her to stop attending school since she is a girl. However, God used Africa Renewal Ministries to keep her in school until now.

Academically, Prisca has always been a hardworking student and has been a top scorer in testing in both Primary and Secondary school. Now at 19 years old, having completed Secondary (high school), her goal is to study medicine and become a gynecologist.

While attending the Sunday school programs organized by Africa Renewal, Prisca began her relationship with God. She is now an evangelist, sharing her faith with others and leading people to Christ in her school and community. Prisca has become a person of influence, taking on leadership roles at school and advocating with the administration for her fellow believers to be allowed to have lunch hour and evening prayers. At the project, she leads praise and worship during Center Days, preaches to her fellow students during fellowships, and teaches God’s Word during Sunday church services. The CDP staff have recognized her as a leader and put her in charge as head of all the girl students at her project. This role involves representing girls’ issues to the project and church leadership.

Prisca desires not only to become a medical doctor but also to continue to champion education for young girls, promote maternal health, and share with people the love and hope that is found in Jesus Christ.

The staff that work with Prisca say: “Prisca is a well-disciplined student, a role model at her project, church, and in the community where many girls drop out of school or are married off by their parents, sometimes before even turning 18 years old.”

DOB: 04/04/2000